Saturnia Thermal Springs in Maremma Tuscany

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Saturnia and its Thermal Springs

Saturnia is a small town in the municipality of Manciano in Maremma, that stands on top of a hill overlooking the famous thermal springs. The town stands close to an Etruscan necropolis along the Roman road Clodia, situated in between the Aurelia and Cassia roads.

Its origins are extremely ancient as proven by the beautiful Porta Romana, Roman Gates, dating back to the 2nd century B.C. set within the medieval walls built by the Aldobrandeschi family. It was a possession of Siena until the 16th century when it became part of the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. Another evidence of its glorious past is certainly the Bagno Santo, Holy Bath, that is an antediluvian holy place a few kilometers from the center. In Saturnia the medieval Church of Santa Maria Maddalena deserves a visit, with its splendid artistic masterpieces as well as the Archeological Museum and the Aldobrandeschi Fortress (not open to public).

What turns Saturnia into an attractive destination are its famous thermal springs. Saturnia's thermal baths are made of several springs stretching from Mount Amiata to the hills of Albenga and Fiora and reaching Roselle and Talamone.
The warm sulphurous waters of Saturnia were well-known by the Etruscans and Romans. Legend has it that its springs are born in the exact point where Jupiter's thunderbolt fell in a battle against Saturn. The thermal waters have a temperature of 37.5 °c and therapeutic and relaxing properties.

In addition to the luxurious, exclusive wellness and spa centers in Saturnia, the are two outdoor waterfalls, the Cascate del Mulino and Cascate del Gorello. The Cascate del Mulino (in the photograph above) are probably the most famous natural springs in Tuscany. The waterfalls are made of several natural pools of warm thermal water, as well as a relaxing waterfall. They are open to the public and free throughout the entire year. The only negative part is parking. During high-season, it can be really hard to find a spot where to park and it is easy to get a parking ticket. So pay attention to where you park... and then relax!

Saturnia and its thermal springs are certainly another gem of in the treasure that the Maremma offers, an area where wild nature and history melts perfectly, making Tuscany the perfect destination for your holidays in Italy!

How to get to Saturnia (thermal baths are at the bottom of the hill)

By Car
Coming from the north of Italy, take the A1 and exit at Florence Certosa. Follow the Florence-Siena road south towars Siena, continuing along toward Grosseto, then to Scansano, Montemerano until you reach Manciano and Saturnia.

If you're coming from southern Italy, take the A12 and exit at Civitavecchia, then get on the S.S. Aurelia until you pass Montalto di Castro, then turn toward Vulci until you reach Manciano and Saturnia.

Distances - from Rome: 180km; from Florence: 200km; from Orvieto: 75km.

By Train + Bus
The closest train station is Albinia but not all trains stop there so make sure to check ahead of time the schedules (www.trenitalia.com). The next closest is the station at Orbetello. From there, take a bus (Rama) from Orbetello or Albinia to Manciano.

These are the bus schedules to Manciano:
http://www.ramamobilita.it/~linee_orari/orari/pdf/Q_41AA.pdf

From Manciano, you'll find connecting buses that take you to Saturnia, here's the schedule:
http://www.ramamobilita.it/~linee_orari/orari/pdf/Q_3.pdf

Get off at Terme at the bottom of the hill for the springs :) Enjoy!

~Discover Tuscany Team

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Tuscany | What to Do in Maremma | What to Do in Tuscany | What to See in Maremma | Tuscany Thermal Baths

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